Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Technology Dependence Essay - 1572 Words

â€Å"Is society too dependent on technology?† Tom thought to himself as he drove to Colorado. He was on a family trip to visit his parents. It was a long trip and he had never been there before so he decided to use his navigation system to get there. He typed in his destination and headed to Colorado. On the way, his four-year-old son threw a juice cup, which spilled all over the navigation system. He did not think he would need a map, and now his family and he are stranded on the highway in the middle of nowhere until they can get assistance. Many people would say that this is the result of depending too much on technology. Some even believe that the generation of today would be better off without it. They think that it is a luxury that†¦show more content†¦Others had a big problem. Two West Coast psychiatrists, a husband and wife team, use pagers to stay in contact with patients. When the satellite broke down, the couple had to pull all-nighters and stay by the pho ne so that patients could reach them during the outage (McCune). Although the satellite did leave them with only one source of communication, having less technology in this situation would not help in the least. The phone at least left them with one source of communication so that they could reach their patients. Many patients would have suffered or even died if it was not for that. As exemplified previously, technology can and has been used to save lives. Hospitals are a prime example of this. At the Parkview North Unit, If a patient needs help and presses the bedside call button, nurses and unit assistants are immediately notified through a wireless communication system, one of several new technologies†¦ (Boen). They even have technology the nurses can use to actually hear the patients, â€Å"Medical staff in the area wear ‘voice badges’ around their necks. When a patient presses the call button, the system alerts the nurse closest to the patient. Using the syst em, the nurse can ask the patient what is needed and respond (Boen). Many doctors agree that these systems of communication benefit them nicely, â€Å"It avoids a lot of extra steps, said Judy Boeger, senior vice president and chief nursing officer at Parkview Health† (Boen). Not only is itShow MoreRelatedThe Medias Dependence On Technology1510 Words   |  7 Pagessimpler lives. We have spent generations, creating innovations within technology to ensure our lives would always be more simplistic than those who lived centuries before us. People now have the ability to update their Facebook status’, map the human genome to target strands of DNA that can be disastrous to one’s health, send out amber alerts nationwide, and create plants that are resistant to pesticides. Innovation in technology has led to advancements in many fields such as medicine, law enforcementRead MoreSocietys Dependence On Technology1405 Words   |  6 Pagescreating innovations within tech nology to ensure our lives would always be more simplistic than those who lived centuries before us. People now have the ability to update their Facebook status’, map the human genome to target strands of DNA that can be disastrous to one’s health, send out amber alerts nationwide, and create plants that are resistant to pesticides. Many fields, such as medicine, law enforcement, and entertainment have benefited greatly from advancements in technology which has inevitablyRead MoreSociety s Dependence On Technology1244 Words   |  5 Pages11- Period 1 2 October 2015 Society’s Dependency On Technology Today, technology is a ruling factor among our society. Technology is involved in every aspect of our lives. Our dependence on technology has been taken to a whole other level, we are now incredibly dependent on technology. We may be too dependent on technology, but our dependence does not necessarily impact us in negative ways. II. Some say the increasing need for technology, specifically social media, causes social isolationRead MoreEssay on Societys Dependence On Technology2170 Words   |  9 PagesTechnology surrounds us. Like water in the ocean, people are swimming in technology each and every day. From the radio playing a favorite song to a text received about the results of a game, people use technology constantly. However, there is a point at which people are overtaken by technology; when the wave engulfs us and there is no way out. People are becoming more and more dependent on technology. Ever since technology began heavily integrating itself into society, many major uses have developedRead MoreOver-dependence on Technology Essay855 Words   |  4 Pages(Tran). All around the world, technology has taken over the lives of many, especially children. Each year younger children are being introduced to new technology to help them learn and grow, but the effects of this may be different from what is expected. Rather than seeing growth, the overuse of technology is leading to man y issues, including a decline in creativity, less active lifestyles, and difficulty falling asleep. The growing overdependence on and overuse of technology is affecting young childrenRead MoreThe Benefits Of Dependence On Technology857 Words   |  4 Pagesrecent years, technology has taken huge steps forward. Things that past generations only dreamed of have come to fruition. Undoubtedly, technology has presented the world with numerous benefits and opportunities. With the aid of technology, the field of medicine has greatly improved. Answers to all of life’s questions lie just one click of tap away. Self-driving cars loom large on the horizon. Technology has made people’s lives so much easier and better, or has it? While technology has brought aboutRead MoreThe United States And Dependence On Technology1174 Words   |  5 PagesThe United States and Their Dependence on Technology Beginning in the early 1990’s there has been a notable increase in technology. As technology has become easily accessible it has caused a disconnection between family, personal health consequences, and education scores to decrease. The tech-era has grown a generation known as â€Å"generation Zuckerberg†, and unfortunately this era is not helping society as planned. There is always a sacred time when digital devices should not be used. Bosses haveRead MoreEffects of Humans Dependence on Technology1310 Words   |  5 PagesHuman’s dependence on technology to store and hold information for them leads to the decline of the human memory. Personal devices are changing the way humans remember information around them, and this is greatly impacting the quality of the human memory. Declarative memory, which is memory associated with facts and knowledge, is the type of memory that is troubled by technology, more specifically, by the internet. In modern society, when individuals are confronted with a question, they do not tryRead MoreThe Dependence of Our Society on Technology625 Words   |  2 Pages During the past two decades technology has seen an explosive progression. In this time we have come from very few people having personal computers, let alone those that were able to connect to the internet to having the equivalent of multiple of the se machine in our pockets connected to the internet at all times. In today’s society many people opt to use their mobile device over a traditional computer and these devices make it rather appealing and easy to do so. With applications that are builtRead MoreDependence On Technology And Social Media1120 Words   |  5 PagesDependency on Technology and Social Media With the mass spread of technology and social media, communicating has become easier and faster, but with no real social connection or effort with the other person. With the need of constant contact through social media and the internet, people continue to rely only on technology to inform them of everything they need to know. Technology and social media are available through apps, videos, and video games for children and adults. Take away phones, computers

Technology Dependence Essay - 1572 Words

â€Å"Is society too dependent on technology?† Tom thought to himself as he drove to Colorado. He was on a family trip to visit his parents. It was a long trip and he had never been there before so he decided to use his navigation system to get there. He typed in his destination and headed to Colorado. On the way, his four-year-old son threw a juice cup, which spilled all over the navigation system. He did not think he would need a map, and now his family and he are stranded on the highway in the middle of nowhere until they can get assistance. Many people would say that this is the result of depending too much on technology. Some even believe that the generation of today would be better off without it. They think that it is a luxury that†¦show more content†¦Others had a big problem. Two West Coast psychiatrists, a husband and wife team, use pagers to stay in contact with patients. When the satellite broke down, the couple had to pull all-nighters and stay by the pho ne so that patients could reach them during the outage (McCune). Although the satellite did leave them with only one source of communication, having less technology in this situation would not help in the least. The phone at least left them with one source of communication so that they could reach their patients. Many patients would have suffered or even died if it was not for that. As exemplified previously, technology can and has been used to save lives. Hospitals are a prime example of this. At the Parkview North Unit, If a patient needs help and presses the bedside call button, nurses and unit assistants are immediately notified through a wireless communication system, one of several new technologies†¦ (Boen). They even have technology the nurses can use to actually hear the patients, â€Å"Medical staff in the area wear ‘voice badges’ around their necks. When a patient presses the call button, the system alerts the nurse closest to the patient. Using the syst em, the nurse can ask the patient what is needed and respond (Boen). Many doctors agree that these systems of communication benefit them nicely, â€Å"It avoids a lot of extra steps, said Judy Boeger, senior vice president and chief nursing officer at Parkview Health† (Boen). Not only is itShow MoreRelatedThe Medias Dependence On Technology1510 Words   |  7 Pagessimpler lives. We have spent generations, creating innovations within technology to ensure our lives would always be more simplistic than those who lived centuries before us. People now have the ability to update their Facebook status’, map the human genome to target strands of DNA that can be disastrous to one’s health, send out amber alerts nationwide, and create plants that are resistant to pesticides. Innovation in technology has led to advancements in many fields such as medicine, law enforcementRead MoreSocietys Dependence On Technology1405 Words   |  6 Pagescreating innovations within tech nology to ensure our lives would always be more simplistic than those who lived centuries before us. People now have the ability to update their Facebook status’, map the human genome to target strands of DNA that can be disastrous to one’s health, send out amber alerts nationwide, and create plants that are resistant to pesticides. Many fields, such as medicine, law enforcement, and entertainment have benefited greatly from advancements in technology which has inevitablyRead MoreSociety s Dependence On Technology1244 Words   |  5 Pages11- Period 1 2 October 2015 Society’s Dependency On Technology Today, technology is a ruling factor among our society. Technology is involved in every aspect of our lives. Our dependence on technology has been taken to a whole other level, we are now incredibly dependent on technology. We may be too dependent on technology, but our dependence does not necessarily impact us in negative ways. II. Some say the increasing need for technology, specifically social media, causes social isolationRead MoreEssay on Societys Dependence On Technology2170 Words   |  9 PagesTechnology surrounds us. Like water in the ocean, people are swimming in technology each and every day. From the radio playing a favorite song to a text received about the results of a game, people use technology constantly. However, there is a point at which people are overtaken by technology; when the wave engulfs us and there is no way out. People are becoming more and more dependent on technology. Ever since technology began heavily integrating itself into society, many major uses have developedRead MoreOver-dependence on Technology Essay855 Words   |  4 Pages(Tran). All around the world, technology has taken over the lives of many, especially children. Each year younger children are being introduced to new technology to help them learn and grow, but the effects of this may be different from what is expected. Rather than seeing growth, the overuse of technology is leading to man y issues, including a decline in creativity, less active lifestyles, and difficulty falling asleep. The growing overdependence on and overuse of technology is affecting young childrenRead MoreThe Benefits Of Dependence On Technology857 Words   |  4 Pagesrecent years, technology has taken huge steps forward. Things that past generations only dreamed of have come to fruition. Undoubtedly, technology has presented the world with numerous benefits and opportunities. With the aid of technology, the field of medicine has greatly improved. Answers to all of life’s questions lie just one click of tap away. Self-driving cars loom large on the horizon. Technology has made people’s lives so much easier and better, or has it? While technology has brought aboutRead MoreThe United States And Dependence On Technology1174 Words   |  5 PagesThe United States and Their Dependence on Technology Beginning in the early 1990’s there has been a notable increase in technology. As technology has become easily accessible it has caused a disconnection between family, personal health consequences, and education scores to decrease. The tech-era has grown a generation known as â€Å"generation Zuckerberg†, and unfortunately this era is not helping society as planned. There is always a sacred time when digital devices should not be used. Bosses haveRead MoreEffects of Humans Dependence on Technology1310 Words   |  5 PagesHuman’s dependence on technology to store and hold information for them leads to the decline of the human memory. Personal devices are changing the way humans remember information around them, and this is greatly impacting the quality of the human memory. Declarative memory, which is memory associated with facts and knowledge, is the type of memory that is troubled by technology, more specifically, by the internet. In modern society, when individuals are confronted with a question, they do not tryRead MoreThe Dependence of Our Society on Technology625 Words   |  2 Pages During the past two decades technology has seen an explosive progression. In this time we have come from very few people having personal computers, let alone those that were able to connect to the internet to having the equivalent of multiple of the se machine in our pockets connected to the internet at all times. In today’s society many people opt to use their mobile device over a traditional computer and these devices make it rather appealing and easy to do so. With applications that are builtRead MoreDependence On Technology And Social Media1120 Words   |  5 PagesDependency on Technology and Social Media With the mass spread of technology and social media, communicating has become easier and faster, but with no real social connection or effort with the other person. With the need of constant contact through social media and the internet, people continue to rely only on technology to inform them of everything they need to know. Technology and social media are available through apps, videos, and video games for children and adults. Take away phones, computers

Monday, May 18, 2020

Caso Marriot Chile - 1570 Words

[pic] Universidad de Chile. Facultad de Ciencias Econà ³micas y Administrativas. Finanzas III Caso No1 Marriott Corporation: The Cost of Capital. [pic] Integrantes: Rodrigo Olivares Sebastià ¡n Bastierre 26 de Abril, 2005. Jorge Toro El problema al que se ve enfrentado Marriott como empresa, si bien puede verse desde variados puntos de vista, se puede resumir en un aspecto principal y relevante. Y esto es calcular cual es el costo de capital de la empresa como un todo; ademà ¡s de calcularlo de manera individual para cada una de sus divisiones, ya que la Marriott las trata en sus anà ¡lisis como si fuesen empresas independientes. Para esto se debe hacer unos†¦show more content†¦|1.36 |44.1% |65% |185.7% |0.67 |22.39% | | | | | | | |100% | |ÃŽ ²s/dPromedio |0.55 | | | | | | Ahora; con esta informacià ³n mà ¡s la que ya està ¡ disponible, se puede calcular el costo de la deuda, el ÃŽ ² del patrimonio con deuda, el costo de patrimonio, y finalmente el costo de capital de la divisià ³n Lodging. Kd = rf + ÃŽ ²d x PRM 1,1% = 8,95% + ÃŽ ²d x 6,77% →

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Darwin in Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde - 1835 Words

In Robert Louis Stevensons The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, as well as in Charles Darwins On the Origin of Species of Natural Selection, mans dual nature is illustrated in terms of evolution and morality. In this essay I will argue that Stevensons description of both the interior and exterior struggles of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde echo Darwins theories of evolution and natural selection. Through close readings, comparisons, and the juxtaposition of the novel and theoretical genre, I will explain how Stevensons physical description of Edward Hyde can be divided into three streams (the primitive being, the animalistic, and the childlike) and mirrors Darwins argument that man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible†¦show more content†¦There is no rational reason as to why Hyde killed this innocent man, only that he could not contain himself and was completely overcome with the instinct to kill. Humans are dynamic parts of society, subject to learn restrain and that violent behavior is socially unacceptable. Hyde however, acts purely on his instincts, typical of an animal that early on learns the harsh realities of the food chain in the animal kingdom. This incorporation of animalistic discourse is also practiced by Darwin: The grounds upon this conclusion rests will never be shaken, for the close similarity between man the lower animals in embryonic development, as well as in innumerable points of structure and constitution, both of high and most trifling importance,- the rudiments which he retains, and the abnormal reversions to which he is occasionally liable.(Darwin, 1362) Here we see Darwin acknowledge our biological relationship to animals that cannot be argued. However, he also extends the relationship between intellectually inferior animals and humans to our behavior. As mentioned in the above quote, natural animal instincts such as the will for individual survival and the protection of children can be found in all animals, including humans. Darwin also acknowledges that humans can sometimes revert to purely animalistic behavior. HoweverShow MoreRelatedThe View of Human Nature Presented in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde3064 Words   |  13 PagesVictorians were very dedicated to their work and gave up their social life for the sake of others and for reputation. Stevenson used science as a base of his novel to suggest duality in human nature. In the same period as the novel was set Charles Darwin, a scientist had suggested that humans had evolved from apes. Stevenson portrays this with his description of the â€Å"animalistic† features of Hyde. Stevenson says ‘has Jekyll become the â€Å"ape-like† Hyde, who moves â€Å"like a monkey†? It’s as JekyllRead More Comparing League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Mary Reilly, and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde2163 Words   |  9 PagesLeague of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Mary Reilly, and Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde      Ã‚   Robert Louis Stevensons short novel, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde has spawned many retellings of Dr. Jekylls tale, as well as variations on the theme. The Jekyll and Hyde conceit is one that lends itself to many different forms of literature, such as motion pictures and sequential art. Sometimes liberties are taken in reinterpretations of Mr. Hyde from the original text

Thatcherism free essay sample

It should be restricted to the bare essentials: defence of the realm and the currency. Everything else should be left to individuals, to exercise their own choices and take responsibility for their own lives. This was a revolutionary, even dangerous, notion to most postwar politicians. Central planning of industry and society had helped win the war. The only way to win the peace, it was believed by the leaders of both the Labour and Conservative parties, was to plan and control industry, vast swathes of which were owned by the state. Margaret Thatcher was not alone in rejecting state ownership of businesses and socialist central planning. Like other right-wingers of her generation, she had been influenced by The Road to Serfdom, by Austrian economist Friedrich Hayek, which warned of the danger of tyranny that inevitably results from government control of economic decision-making through central planning. But Hayeks brand of free-market economics was deeply out of favour in the 1950s and 1960s. It was only when the country had been crippled by industrial strife and decline that it began to look like a credible alternative. Thatcher belonged to a Conservative Party faction, headed by Keith Joseph, who were followers of Hayeks Austrian school of economics and were also heavily influenced by the theories of American economist Milton Friedman. Had Joseph become Conservative leader instead of Thatcher. which seemed the more likely outcome at the time, then something resembling Thatcherism might have emerged as the prevailing economic philosophy of the age. But it would not have been the same. It took Thatchers own background and personality, her belief in traditional family values and strong defence, her suspicion of an overmighty Europe and instinctive affinity with the US, to give shape and meaning to what we now know as Thatcherism. Taking her cue from Friedman, she advocated monetarism, controlling the money supply with high interest rates, to tame inflation without resorting to union-negotiated pay policies. Her battle against inflation led to mass unemployment, but despite that she managed to win a second general election. Low taxation was a key area where Thatcherism was applied. Under the previous Labour government, there had been high levels of income tax for high-earners, but Thatcher progressively cut income tax the basic rate of tax fell to 25%, while the higher rate was slashed from 83% to 40%. There was a shift away from direct taxation to indirect, for example by increasing VAT from 8% to 15%. Thatcherism also focused on rolling back the frontiers of the state. To that end, Thatcher introduced privatisation of state-owned industries, including British Telecom, British Gas, British Airways and electricity companies, putting them back into private hands. Such a retreat of the public sector from large areas of the industrial landscape would have seemed unthinkable a few years before, but were pushed through. Since Thatchers day, such privatisation has gone further, says Thatcher expert Professor Richard Toye, of the University of Exeter, citing the privatisation of British Rail under her successor John Major. There was also a huge sale to tenants of council housing. The government also abandoned its commitment to full employment, stating this was the responsibility of employers and employees. Thatcherism is also associated with the Iron Ladys own personal style, says Prof Toye. She saw herself as a conviction politician. She prided herself on her what she would call steadfastness, and what others would call her inflexibility. She inherited a party that contained supporters of her predecessor Ted Heath, labelled by her as wets, who opposed her monetarist policies and cuts to public spending. In the early stages she had to continue to include them in the cabinet, says Prof Toye, but then gradually she rid herself of them. It was not clear in 1975 what a Thatcher government would mean for Britain. And it was clear when she came to power that she couldnt move too far too fast. That was reflected by her moving with caution and carefully at first in her first term. Although Thatcherism was based on the austere-sounding philosophy of monetarism, Thatcher wanted to put a human face on it, so she talked about running the countrys finances like a thrifty housewife. She also mad e much of her personal story. It was a fundamental part of her image emphasising he value of hard work, her background as a grocers daughter, says Prof Toye. She contrasted that with the union leaders who she believed were trying to block economic progress. She believed that Victorian family values were the way to improve society, through people bettering themselves. This was not just through economic means, but there was an element of it being linked to respectability and societal values, Prof Toye says. Conventional marriage and a nuclear family were the building blocks, he says. One example of her impact on society was the inclusion of Section 28 of the Local Government Act 1988. The controversial clause stated that a local authority shall not promote the teaching in any maintained school of the acceptability of homosexuality as a pretended family relationship. Because it did not create a criminal offence, no prosecution was ever brought under this provision. While the legacy of many Thatcher policies remain to this day, Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron wants to legalise gay marriage a stance inconceivable to Baroness Thatcher, and a huge change, says Prof Toye.

Wireless Metropolitan Area Networks †Free Samples to Students

Question: Discuss about the Wireless Metropolitan Area Networks. Answer: Introduction Wireless metropolitan area networks (WMANs) which allows users to identify wireless networks between several areas in a city. WMAN can be used in cases where wired network become unavailable. WMANs can utilize technologies such as microwave, millimeter wave, broadband radio, free space and Wi-Fi Hotspots. (Burbank, 2013). This technology covers long distance, dedicated bandwidth and high capacity. Its links include full indoor, full outdoor, broadcast links and split mount to meet the different client needs for metropolitan scale microwave networks (Westcott Coleman, 2015). Cost: initial cost is relatively lower as in other technologies because no physical components are needed. Data capacity: 400(364) Mbps and 800(728) Mbps for High performance microwave radios Offers up to and 1.6Gbps and higher up to 3Gbps for full duplex payload. Service Area: up to radius of 100km Installation speed: faster to set up Security: Subject to Electromagnetic and Other Interference Millimeter Wave (MMW) Provides between 100mbps and 2.5 Gbps bandwidth in 60-90 GHz in TodaysMillimeter Wave (MMW) products offers 100Mbps up to 2.5 Gbps throughput in 60-90GHz range. It is a wireless transmission technology with very fast point to point connections. In metropolitan areas with congested frequencies it provides high speed connections (In Kim In Joukov, 2017). Cost: Relatively higher cost than microwave Data capacity: 100Mbps to 2.5 Gbps Service Area: up to radius of 20km Installation speed: slower than microwave Security: Better security and privacy compared to microwave MIMO OFDM Broadband Radio This technology operates on lower frequencies in the 2-6GHz to offer point to multipoint or point to point connections. Current technology provides carrier-class broadband radio devices with capacity of 867Mbps in either unlicensed or licensed bands. Widely used in wireless ISP, business enterprises, CCTV applications and governments. Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) is a technology which addresses the problem of signal bouncing and allows Non-line-of-sight broadcasting though buildings, trees and other structures. It can be deployed in architectures like star, bus, mesh ring among others. MIMO technology utilizes several dimensional streams on similar frequency to boost rates of data 2- 4 times speed of non-MIMO devices (Angelescu, 2010). Cost: initial cost relatively high compared to other technologies. Data capacity: up to 867Mbps Service Area: up to radius of 20km Installation speed: takes relatively a longer time Security: Better security and privacy compared to microwave Free Space Optics This technology is based on optical communication that uses tweaked light to propagate data broadcasting through the atmosphere wirelessly. This differs from fibre optic which utilizes guided media such as fibre to transmit optical signals. This technology utilizes infrared light either LED or laser equipment. Free Space Optics typically uses transmission in the infrared bands using either Laser or LED devices. It offers high rates of data, superior beam collimation and high power output. Compared to microwave and Millimeter waves, it does not suffer from attenuation. Affected by atmospherically conditions such as dust storms, snow and thick fog which limits link reliability between 1-4km depending on location. Covers connection up to 4km and capacity of up to 1.5Gbps (Burbank, 2013). Cost: very low initial cost Data capacity: up to 1.5Gbps Service Area: up to radius of 4km Installation speed: very simple and takes less than 1 hour Security: line of sight operations makes its a secure system. Recommendation Therefore,if ZeeTech is considering implementing a WMAN technology then microwave is the best. This is because it is relatively cheaper to install compared to other technologies, higher bandwidth, large coverage area and ease of installation. This will link all its offices across Melbourne as well as provide mobile wireless access to the field workers that need to travel between different sites in a city. Reference Westcott, D. A., Coleman, D. D. (2015).CWNA certified wireless network administrator. Indianapolis, Indiana : John Wiley Sons In Kim, K. J., In Joukov, N. (2017).Mobile and wireless technologies. Singapore : Springer. Angelescu, S. (2010).CCNA certification all-in-one for dummies. Hoboken, N.J: Wiley. Burbank, J. L. (2013).Wireless networking: Understanding internetworking challenges. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley.

Thursday, April 23, 2020

Lulu Guinness Brand and Fashion Essay Example

Lulu Guinness Brand and Fashion Essay Brand and Fashion assignment 2 Lulu Guinness Brand Positioning â€Å"Positioning is the act of designing the company’s offering and image so that they occupy a meaningful and distinct competitive position in the target customer’s minds. †(Kotler, 1997. ) Lulu Guinness is an accessory designer, successful for creating a brand which produces exquisite witty handbags and a range of collections, such as umbrella, sock, hosiery, scarves and sunglasses. The brand has a strong reputation for expressing â€Å"true British glamour and spirit†, (Fulton, 2008).Lulu Guinness’s success started in 1989, when she designed her first handbag, for sale in a number of exclusive stores in London such as Liberty’s and Joseph. This early success prompted the beginning of her career, which heavily relies on wisdom combined with wittiness and quirkiness implemented in a distinctly kitsch and feminine way. Lulus strong personal style and her original ideas have playe d a large part in her success with her design inspiration springing partly from retro glamour and partly from modern chic.Lulu Guinness’s brand appeals to a broad age range of individuals, from school girl to granny, and from punk to posh debutante. Their target market is likely to be creative individuals, who have confidence in themselves and their appearance. They will also be likely to enjoy drawing attention and taking risks from the way they look and the things that they wear. These consumers tend to carefully choose the clothing and accessories that they buy.Their accessories and clothing can often reflect their personalities and they like to express themselves in bold, brass ways. â€Å"Dare to be different†- Lulu Guinness. Wild praise in the fashion media paved the way for Lulu Guinness shops in London, New York and Tokyo. Her unique creations are also sold in department and specialty stores worldwide, including Harrods, Selfridges and Fortnum and Mason in the UK. Also, Brown Thomas in Ireland and Lane Crawford in Hong Kong.